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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> at the center of the greatest manhunt in history. >> the c.i.a.'s biggest secret is that its best buys women. because she's working undercover as a c.i.a. agent she can't get credit. >> in the intelligence business, you work from a lot of sources. >> >> cenk: zero dark 30 is the movie about our manhunt on osama bin laden. there's a scene where someone gets tottured. he took the side that yes i'm finally vindicated my pro torture argument. go ahead moral compass of television. >> i've had to listen to people on this show for years tell me well, the c.i.a. program didn't work. waterboarding didn't work, and i knew that was just not true. it did get information for terrorists that eventually led to not just the killing of osama bin laden but a lot of victories. >> cenk: that's of course absolutely not true, as i'm about to show you. conservatives, liberal hollywood, don't believe the movies approximate the minute there's a movie on their side, i told you we were right. >> it is continued because the mainstream media loves torture. >> there's no question in the record that shows or in other rese
security. is it realistic? we've got a c.i.a. agent to talk about it. >> are you presently in alabama? >> no, do you intend to answer truthfully here today? do you intend to answer truthfully here today? >> yes. >> all right, here is our former c.i.a. agent. she'll tell us what is realistic and what is not and especially the polygraph test. i'm interested in that when we come back. (vo) now, it's your turn. (vo) connect with the young turks with cenk uygur. >> it's go time. >> cenk: well, we gist had a rescue michigan going down in afghanistan, an ask you mission for a doctor who had been captured by the enemy and petty officer first class nicholas checque was involved in that mission, and lost his life in that mission. good morning america has more details. >> the team moved in by helicopter in darkness when it became clear that dr. joseph was in immanent danger or may be moved to afghanistan. they tracked the american in the mountains of eastern afghanistan where they had hidden joseph among some small huts. a fire fight broke out as soon as the special forces team arrived. several
't talk to any of the cia people involved. what i have heard is that the screenwriter kind of drank the kool-aid and fell in love with his cia sources and are taking their point of view. peter bergen in his book "manhunt" and also in a recent article implies that there was absolutely no link between so-called extreme interrogation and information that led to the courier who ultimately brought them to bin laden. >> for those having seen the film, do you believe it makes the case that torture was essential in killing bin laden? >> can i answer that in a vigorously wishy washy way? >> i guess you will. >> because i think that kathryn bigelow, if you look at her last film, the hurt locker" it gain with a quote from chris hedges to the effect that war is a drug, an addiction, and kathryn bigelow is kind of an amoral filmmaker. she portrayed a woman who is basically addicted to revenge, who is on a kind of counter jihad. big low takes her point of view and shoots the torture scenes in a neutral way, they are ugly, disturbing and at the same time given what the film is about, they don't ex
's based on the story of a real-life c.i.a. agent who successfully tracked down the world's most wanted terrorist. there appears to be drama about the same spy off-screen as well. according to the "washington post," the unidentified operative was passed over for a big promotion, after the raid. and has ad argued with her colleagues over credit for the mission. so dan, a the movie premiers next week. but the woman is the central figure and hailed as the central figure because she pushed over and over for a year saying it's the curious that will lead us for bin laden. she is causing a bit of a stir because i guess she didn't get this promotion and hit replay all to e-mail announcement of the award that everyone is getting, she got one say, saying you tried to obstruct me, you fought me, only i deserve the award. maybe not good to shoot inside the tent in this one? >> bob: i thought the courier thing was george bush intelligence operation. >> andrea: is your name dana? >> bob: sorry. >> dana: it's okay. when i read about this today this is the first time i heard about her. it's hard for me
experience in the cia, how would you approach even solving this mystery in front of us right now? >> i mean, it has to come from intelligence. i doubt that the fbi, as good of work as they really do, are going to get the answers they need talking to libyan witnesses. this has to come through clandestine sources, technical means that'll allow us to pinpoint who did this. you're going to be listening to intercepts and things along this line which will allow you to act. i don't want to act against people who are not responsible for this, but i think after three months considering we have the world's best intelligence agencies and investigators, it's troubling to me, i'm disappointed that we haven't been able to bring these people to justice. and like i said, this is sending a terrible signal to folks around the world. and, you know, rick just mentioned mali. that's a place that's becoming an al-qaeda state. jenna: and youty they're -- do you think there's a connection there? why? >> it's a result of what happened in libya, because after the revolution was over in the libya, the arab spring upr
doctor who was a c.i.a. informant and helped us hunt down osama bin laden? he's reportedly been tortured in a pakinstani prison, according to his brother. back in june, the doctor was sentenced to 33 years behind bars for conspiring against pakistan. now six months into his sentence, is the united states doing enough to secure his release? let's talk to fox news legal analyst, peter johnson, jr. >> he's being left for dead. >> steve: he is? >> he's an honorary american. 3,000 lives, more, on september 11. >> steve: he's being tortured. >> he tried to get bin laden and infiltrated through a dna ruse, hepatitis vaccine. now he's been tortured, burned with cigarettes, according to reports. he's been shocked. he was blindfolded for a year. he had his hands tied behind his back for a year. the state department says we're trying to get him out. we're trying to negotiate a release. there was a bill the defense authorization act of 2013 trying to limit the $800 million going to counter insurgency funds in pakistan and saying, listen, the department of defense has to sign off that they're doing e
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)